Category Archives: Web

All things web related.

Gmail scripts – Mark Read During Business Hours

I quickly threw this together. The following script would mark all Gmail email coming in to be read if it’s Monday through Friday between the hours of 9am and 5pm. This is done at http://script.google.com with the API from https://developers.google.com/apps-script/reference/gmail/.

Don’t forget to click on Resources > Current Project’s Triggers and have it run once a minute!

function markReadDuringBusHours() {
    var currentDate = new Date();
    var currentDay = currentDate.getDay();
    var currentHour = currentDate.getHours();
    var threads = GmailApp.getInboxThreads();
    if (currentHour > 8 && currentHour < 18 && currentDay > 0 && currentDay < 6)
    {
        GmailApp.markThreadsRead(threads);
    }
}

CSS3 and the @font-face tag

Ars Technica has a good article on the recent re-implementation of the @font-face tag which is supported in Firefox 3.5 or Safari 4. Basically, it is allowing web designers to have a font used in a web page that is stored on the web server. For example, here I am using the font “Jellyka“:

If you have the latest Firefox or Safari, you see this properly!

 

Don't forget to take a look at this page in IE. Quite different! Which is why it is still important to do a browser check.

Notice you can still highlight the text since it is not an image, just text with that font applied.

A good explanation on how to use the @font-face tag is here. Here is another good example of its usage and what it is about.

HTML 5 Audio and Video

If you can see the video below, you have an HTML 5 compatible browser. If you can't, try getting the latest Firefox, Opera, or Safari browsers.

That video was created with the following HTML 5 code:

<video tabindex=”0″ controls=”controls” height=”385″ width=”640″><source src=”http://videos.mozilla.org/firefox/3.5/meet/meet.ogv” type=”video/ogg; codecs=&quot;theora, vorbis&quot;”></source><source src=”http://videos.mozilla.org/firefox/3.5/meet/meet.mp4″ type=”video/mp4″></source></video>

A decent link to hit up to understand the new <VIDEO> tag is here.

HTML 5 browsers natively support the open-source Theora video, Vorbis audio formats, and Ogg transport layer that both are stored in. I think they all do but I'll have to double-check that.

To encode a video into these formats, you can use the free SUPER media encoder (scroll to the bottom of the page for the link). It does have the best UI, but it works. I would suggest familiarizing yourself with their site (which needs a massive design lift) and test like crazy. Sooner or later, everything will be supporting import/export of this format.

There is a lot more to HTML 5 than just audio and video. I'll post more when I have time.

KentD.com – Hosting, Web Development, Consulting



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Each web site hosting/email package is customized to the needs of the client. Services include:

  • Web site hosting with PHP and MySQL databases.
  • Email with spam filtering.
  • Custom web site development.
  • Personal web site maintenance.
  • Online invoicing and bill pay.
  • Shopping cart development.
  • Portal web site development.
  • Google Analytics web site statistics.
  • Search Engine Optimization (SEO).

If you are interested in web site hosting, email hosting, web development, or consulting services, please do not hesitate to contact me.

Radio Recorder – Record Internet Radio

Invisible BoomboxIf you're like me, your company doesn't allow for listening to internet radio stations at work. So I looked for a way to record the radio on my Mac and, of course, there's a great free app called “Radio Recorder” that does just that and goes the extra mile — it will split the songs and tag them with the information provided by the feed, and then import them into your iTunes library in a designated playlist. This works with some stations but not all. For example, with WOXY it works great (too bad it's only a 64k feed) but with KEXP it does not. I guess it's dependent on what's available in the stream. It works with most ShoutCast feeds.

Definitely a must have app. I'm sure there's a Windows app that does a similar thing.

One rub though, if you use the split song feature, it won't always grab the song at the beginning. It grabs it when it receives the new song data, which might also cut a song short. So you won't have perfect mp3's from the radio, but it's better than nothing.

I think a nice option would be either a single file with chapters as new songs or code in some overlap — copy 5 seconds of the last file as the beginning of the next file and the same with the end.  

Comcast’s Packet-Forging Activities

Apparently, Comcast is forging packet data to its users when they use file-sharing applications like BitTorrent or Gnutella. The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has released difficult to use software for users to verify this for themselves. It's a python app, runs from the command-line, requires the pcapy Python library, setting up a tunnel (potentially), WireShark , and worst of all, a FRIEND. Anyway, I'm glad I'm not on Comcast but I might check out Cox to see if they're doing anything as well.

FOIA project

Apple symbols and their values

Here's how to create these symbols on your keyboard in OS X:

  1. Basic setup; to be done once:
    • Open the International preference panel in System Preferences
    • Under the Input Menu tab, check the Unicode Hex Input box
    • Check the Show input menu in menu bar checkbox. The Input Method Menu Extra will appear as a national flag in the top right of your screen.
  2. Click the flag and select U+ Unicode Hex Input
  3. Hold down Option while entering the hexadecimal value and the symbol appears

To use these symbols in HTML:

  • Prefix a decimal value with &#
  • Prefix a hexadecimal value with &#x
  • Suffix with a semicolon, ;

To use these symbols in Javascript, prefix the hexadecimal value with u.